Linda Halcomb's Blog

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January 29, 2014 January 29, 2014

Filed under: Abstract,Daily Post,Watercolors — lindahalcombfineart @ 7:21 am
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BRRRRR! Still cold here in Indianapolis, Indiana. Later this week it may get up to freezing…a heat wave. OK, I know I need to stop whining – boring! So I started thinking about the beauty of sun on snow. I love the colors you see in the shadows and the beautiful colors you see when sky, trees and buildings are reflected. Pinks and blues and lavendars. I wanted to try a new technique using plastic wrap so I did a new painting I call Winter 2014. I guess we only want to remember the good stuff.

Winter 2014 #1

Winter 2014 #1

The darks are intended to represented the discomfort and depression many are feeling. Right now those feelings are just below the surface. Also the deep shadows you see in bright sunlight. Overall the painting was successful because I love color and this combination is very nice…I just did not leave enough WHITE.

 

 

November 4, 2013 November 4, 2013

Filed under: Abstract,Acrylics,Daily Post — lindahalcombfineart @ 7:44 am
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When I get stuck or when I have difficulty with one media I switch to another. A year or so ago one of my daughters gave me a whole stack of ATC sized papers, including an assortment pack that included canvas. I don’t do many acrylic paintings but I did sell one last year. It was an impressionistic landscape that included our giant neighborhood oak tree. I decided to try an ATC sized acrylic with a big red maple as my subject. You probably remember that I am fascinated by the glowing oranges, golds and reds of the Indiana forests during autumn. Well here it is. I call it The Red Head at the End of the Road – big name for a little painting.

Red Head at the End of the Road - ATC

Red Head at the End of the Road – ATC

 

 

 

October 16, 2012 October 17, 2012

Filed under: ATC's,Daily Post,Drawings — lindahalcombfineart @ 6:57 am
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Some of you that have followed my blog for awhile will remember that I give my family ATC’s for Christmas. They get an original work of art with their Christmas card and I have fun creating them. Two days ago I suddenly realized I had not started making my ATC’s (artist trading cards)…not one! Luckily I am immersed in a vibrant, glowing Indiana autumn. When I walked Buffy and Baxter yesterday I gathered a handful of beautiful red and orange maple leaves. They are full of color and vitality and I made a start. Photography exaggerates the flaws since these are so small.

Maple Leaf 2 – ATC

Maple Leaf 1 – ATC

 

October 16, 2011 October 21, 2011

I have never specifically shown the work of another artist on my blog BUT, as a huge promoter of the Watercolor Society of Indiana and a HUGE fan of the top three artists of 2011, I wanted to share the magic they create with you, my fellow artists and bloggers. I have included the Judge’s Comments and comments from the artists. You may also see notes from me since I pulled this information together for use by the docents at the IMA.

2011 Best in Show - A Sanguine Summer by Jerry Smith

Smith, Jerry, Sanguine Summer, acrylic on paper 29 x 21

Wilbur Meese Memorial Award: BEST IN SHOW

“This painting has beautiful flow, movement, and balance.  Everything good about composition exists in the painting.  The color is incredible—especially the grays.  I want to take this painting home with me.”

I’m constantly drawn to the Indiana landscape, especially the rolling hills and small farms found in the southern part of the state. In recent years I’ve been particularly interested in incorporating the textures and shapes of large foregrounds into my paintings. I’ve found the layering of acrylic paints useful in achieving the desired results.

Because this painting won Best-in-Show (and because I wanted to incorporate it in a Public Tour called Impressionism and Beyond) I sent Jerry several questions. Here are his answers to my mini-in terview. (PS I had to look it up…sanguine means cheerful or hopeful.)

1. Do you think of yourself as having a particular style or following a particular “school” of art?

I have not attempted to follow a particular style or school of painting. My beginning tendency was toward tight realism, but my preference is impressionism. I have spent many years trying to make this transition. I feel my main influence has been the Impressionists, especially the Cape Ann School painters such as Frederick Mulhaupt, Harry Vincent, and Aldro Hibbard.

2. Do you do plein air sketching and/or painting? Do you ever start a painting en plein air and finish in the studio?

Yes, I always carry and sketchbook and watercolors when I travel. I do both plein air and studio painting. When painting outside I prefer to finish the painting on location. However, weather or time limitations sometimes force me to finish or rework a painting in the studio.

3. Do you ever do a series of paintings of a specific location?

I love to work this way. Many times in the course of doing a painting, I get ideas about how the painting could be done in a different way or pushed in a different direction.

4. Do you have a favorite palette of colors?

I have no favorite colors. I use a fairly limited palette made up primarily of a warm and a cool in each of the primary colors plus a green and an earth tone, such as burnt sienna.

5. What do you consider most critical to a successful landscape (ie color, line, composition, value contrasts)?

It is very difficult to rank the order of importance for the elements of painting. They are all important. If forced to do so, I would have to say that it is critical to have a good composition before other things can be considered. It seems that color ranks very high among people viewing paintings.

6. How long does it take for you to paint a work like “Sanguine Summer”?

Sanguine Summer is a studio painting done from sketches and photos. A painting takes as long as it takes. Sometimes I work on a painting in more than one session and I tend to lose track of time when doing so. I also spend time planning and thinking about a painting before I ever start so I hesitate to put number estimates on the time put into a painting. An oft heard clichéd answer is “It took x hours to do the painting and a lifetime to learn how.”

 

November 18, 2010 November 19, 2010

Filed under: Daily Post,Watercolors — lindahalcombfineart @ 8:54 am
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On October 20th I posted a painting I was working on. I was really having trouble with part of it and have been thinking and working on it off and on for several days. I think I have taken the painting as far as I can right now. I still don’t know if it is finished but for now I am calling it complete. I hope that, with all the work and rework, I have not lost the lovely glow of Indiana in the autumn.

Indiana Autumn

 

October 20, 2010 October 20, 2010

Filed under: Daily Post,Watercolors — lindahalcombfineart @ 6:05 pm
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I am not quite done with this but close. I have a problem I trying to solve. I’m not sure if I can to be honest. My husband convinced me that my man and dog needed to be lower than I originally planned. I planned to have them walking through the sunlit area but he felt strongly that they should be lower and when I put my drawing on tracing paper it looked good. The problem is that the paint already applied in this area was already pretty dark with quite a bit of texture. I have been working with the man and I have lost some of his shape but I am fairly happy with the colors but the dog is a ghost dog at this point. I am setting it aside for tonight and while think on this awhile…

Indiana Autumn 90%

 

October 19, 2010 October 19, 2010

Filed under: Daily Post,Watercolors — lindahalcombfineart @ 5:50 pm
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I couldn’t decide whether to post my work-in-progress but it is about 75% of the way to completion and the most important component of the subject matter is yet to come. I love color and I love the Indiana autumn. I love the red and gold maple trees and I love walking my dogs every morning. All of these marvelous things are coming together (slowly!) in this painting. So here goes:

Indiana Autumn 75% of the way to completion