Linda Halcomb's Blog

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July 1, 2010 July 2, 2010

Filed under: Daily Post,Watercolors — lindahalcombfineart @ 7:29 am
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I need your help! I feel like I am stuck right now splashing paint. I painted this yesterday. I love Geraniums and one of my first paintings in 2007 was of geraniums and white verbena. I painted this yesterday with no reference and I did not do a drawing. I had the drawing in my head and “saw” my finished painting. As I worked I did think about the comment Leslie made recently about using one continuous line to make her drawing. I tried to make the red of the geraniums make a continuous whole (not always possible) so the red would lead your eye around the painting.  Now, like I said I feel like I am stuck and not making much improvement at the moment. I want to invite you to critique my work. Do not be kind. I need the information. I am not in any class right now so I am turning to my blogging friends. Just a note – I worked and worked but the color is slightly off – particularly the pot is more balanced with the rest of the painting than it looks – a little brighter and deeper valued. You are all so generous and talented I hope you will help me. You WILL NOT hurt my feelings and any thoughts are appreciated!!!!!

The Geranium Pot

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13 Responses to “July 1, 2010”

  1. deadsignal Says:

    I quite like the colours used for this! It’s hard to critique something so beautiful.

    The only thing that comes to my mind is that the Geraniums feel a little lost to me in the background. Perhaps working on bringing out the vibrancy of Geraniums will help define them more.

  2. Artswebshow Says:

    It is really very good

  3. I think it’s a cool composition. The flowers are bursting out of the pot. The only issue I see is the lack of dark values – maybe the pot and some negative-painted stems and leaves?

    • Thank you Yevgenia! I think you are right about the values. I lightened some of the areas but then painted over them again which darkened them again. I get focused on color and forget value…and that is a BAD thing!

  4. Naomi Says:

    Hi LInda,

    I agree with Yevgenia – you need contrast. I took a copy of the larger image you have, placed it into Photoscape, and then turned it into grey scale. Mostly middle tones. More darks, more lights.

    I like the energy which the abstraction gives the painting, but it is lost by the lack of eye-energy in contrast.

    Hope this helps!

    • I think that’s one of the problems with flowers. Green and red are both mid-range values and I get lost in my painting and forget about value. Yellow geraniums and purple leaves anyone? Thank you!!!

  5. lesliepaints Says:

    When I suggest continuous line, I always know that I am going to get something a little distorted. Line work is different than dabbing but not impossible to use for a portrayal of geraniums. To me, it looks as though you used an impressionistic approach to painting the flowers and surrounding greens, blues and violets. The texture that was created by doing this is absolutely lovely. I think the problem lies in the fact that you have used no reference material for this and it longs for those rich darks and lights. This painting is rendered all in midtones. Look at some geraniums and see where the darks are. I would think that they may be in and around the flowers, in the depths of the leaves. Decide what you would like the focal point to be and perhaps take us there with your darks. You can do anything you want when you create from your mind’s eye. This is lovely in texture and really speaks of flowers. The drama comes in the values. It’s OK to google flower images or look in your own garden to get ideas on where darks are. Good job Linda. You have an experimental spirit!

  6. lesliepaints Says:

    PS….You have rich darks in watercolor in diox violet and some of the blues like prussian. The violet is always found in the darks in nature. Squint at a patch of flowers in the early morning and late evening when the light is more dramatic. You will see it.

  7. CarolKing Says:

    I actually like your painting the way it is, BUT….if you want to change it slightly, then I will echo my fellow bloggers. Put some dark values in throughout the flowers and maybe a bit in the flower-pot. Although, I think yellow geraniums and purple leaves might be fun!

  8. Stephen Says:

    Hey Linda – There is so much going in this painting that I really like. I see a lovely abstract of geraniums. I love the top left corner where you have light mid and darker tones.

    You may wish to soften or ‘lose’ more of the edges in mass of reds and greens and let them mix a little.

    But you are on a journey.

    I hope you do more of this subject and make many more attempts you don’t like. When we feel stuck – often the only way forward is to do more ‘stuck’ paintings. In my painting I find I don’t usually overcome the ‘stuckness’ when I do lots of the same subject – but when I try something new, I find I have tools I didn’t have before.

    This is such a joyful watercolour – you are to be encouraged in your search for growth.

  9. Robert Says:

    Linda…
    First…I love the looseness and the colors…the flowers themselves are delightful.
    I can see trying two things (assuming this is a watercolor on w/c paper):
    More of the petals could have been painted in wet in wet with the background to create edge variety and a lost and found effect.
    2. I think you need a dark value shadow area…not dark accents here and there. I think I would try using some pthalo turquoise ( or pthalo green mixed with a little pthalo blue) darkened slightly by adding a bit of either cadmium scarlet or venetian red (small amt. of VR) and then darken the lower spaces on the rt. side of the bouquet, droppiing in some petals so the edges could mingle. I would allow the top of the pot to catch dark shadows of flowers above it. All a guess and all my silly opinion. Robert


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